beyerdynamic DT 990 PRO Studio Headphones


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Difference from the DT 990 Edition Version

The DT 990 Edition headphones for the home and the DT 990 PRO studio headphones: Both are identical in sound. Identical sound transducers are used. However, the edition models have a slightly softer headband for music enjoyment at home while the Pro model sits somewhat tighter on the head, in order to stay in position with frequent movements during a studio session. In addition, the PRO version is delivered with a spiral cable and the edition version with a straight cable.

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Construction Type Closed (strong noise isolation) Semi-Open (low noise level) Open (noise escapes)
Sound Prominent bass, less spatial, transparent, detailed Neutral, relaxed, relatively spatial, more restrained bass, transparent Balanced bass and treble, analytical, very spatial, transparent
Cable (length and type) 16 Ohm: 3 m straight cable, 32 Ohm: 1.6 m straight cable, 80 Ohm: 3 m straight cable, 250 Ohm: 3 m coiled cable 3 m coiled cable 3 m coiled cable
Replaceable Parts ✓ ✓ ✓


Weight: 250 g
Size: 250 OHM
Dimensions: 22.1 x 11.94 x 23.11 cm; 250 Grams
Model: 459038
Colour: Gray
Colour: Gray
Dimensions: 22.1 x 11.94 x 23.11 cm; 250 Grams
Origin: Germany
Size: 250 OHM

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175 Responses

  1. Aime says:

     United Kingdom 🇬🇧

    The sound image is out in front of you in the room, all the instruments or performers in their position in the sound stage. Great for concerts or smaller venues. Unbelievable. (Being 250ohm they will probably need an amplifier for iPads or phones)

  2. Anonymous says:

     United Kingdom

    Took a while playing around with EQ to get the “right” (very subjective) sound, really needed to reign that treble in but soundstage and clarity. If you’re willing/able to put the work in to eq them, they’ll be great, not great for beginners or those who just want to plug in and use

  3. Anonymous says:

     United Kingdom

    At first I didn’t have an audio interface to plug it into, so I was just plugging it straight into my computer and I thought it wasn’t really worth the money. But once I bought a Scarlett Solo and plugged them in the audio quality was the best I have ever heard from a pair of headphones. If you buy these I definitely recommend also buying an audio interface to power them properly.

  4. Anonymous says:

     United Kingdom

    The length of these headphones are unbelievable
    The soft comfort of each earphone is way better than the solid headphones I used to use
    Many head size settings
    Quality is outstanding

  5. Anonymous says:

     United Kingdom

    These headphones are meant for true audio reproduction and studio monitoring. Don’t buy them if you want enhanced bass and treble for uses such as gaming. I mix my own recordings with headphones and studio monitors. I wanted headphones that provide true reproduction of the audio coming from my audio interface, synthesisers and DAW. I’m very impressed with them in respect of sound quality, accuracy, build quality and vfm.

  6. Anonymous says:

     United Kingdom

    As far as i can tell these are the cheapest yet best sounding headphones available as in the ratio between sound quality and cost is very very good the sound profile of these are close to audiophile multi thousand pound/dollar sennheisers the high frequencys are a little sharp but with hours of use the sharpness will level out more should you use a pre amp? In my opinion no with a high end smart phone you’ll get close to perfect audio output though that depends on the chipset but most are great though the quality is great the output volume of most high end phones isn’t due to the headphones having a high impedance but i never find myself needing more then max volume from the phone if you want more volume try a pc with a highend motherboard windows 10 can support up to 192k sample rate at 32bit as well as isolated audio components keeping electrical interference low as for pre amps if you have the money ask a professional or use sennheisers recommended ones last thing due to the open back the noise cancelling basically doesn’t exist but i prefer it because if someone calls my name i can hear i

  7. dealzon says:

     United Kingdom

    Best Headset I ever had. Amazing sound and you can still hear everything in the room so it’s not disorientating or you arent shouting when playing or listening to things. Only gripe is that the ear pieces aren’t that easy to replace (the fluffy part that covers your ears) If you work in a hot environment and are sweating a lot you need to wash them cause they get revolting after a while. I replaced mine with cheap 3rd party foam ones so I can wipe them down and keep everything clean and hygienic. Pretty much the only issue I had with them. Maybe a braided rope over the cables too so they don’t tangle if they making a new design maybe? just a thought. Try them out you will like them, i’d bet money on it.

  8. ELEMalissa says:

     United Kingdom

    This headset exceeded my expectations, highly recommended if you have a good amp for it.

  9. WilsonLillibrid says:

     United Kingdom

    Great audio profile but is quite flat ranged, would need an equaliser to get the best out of these.

  10. Anonymous says:

     United Kingdom

    Keeping this short and sweet… I’ve never heard audio quality like it.

  11. ZandraTCVW says:

     United Kingdom

    Noise cancelling only occures in a private quiet area. With a proper sound device, every single sound is heart very clear. Easy to use, just plug and play.
    I rate all features high, as I have adapted “environment, volume, noises” etc. and this product works exactly as it should.

  12. RositaDuncombe says:

     United Kingdom

    I use for gaming and music and watching videos.
    They have good sound quality but to use them for there full volume you would need an amplifier to help with editing music files.

  13. Brie Barbee says:

     United Kingdom

    I’m not a gamer so don’t know how they would be for that use but – I’m an audio pro & have been relying on these excellent headphones for many years now – an industry standard. These are open so if you’re looking for ‘phones that are quiet to use (i.e for singers to wear etc) go for the DT 770 Pro model – they’re closed.

  14. Anonymous says:

     United Kingdom

    Absolutely superb! German designed studio headphones for critical listening. I had read many reviews that said the top end is prominent or a little too bright. Not for me. The top end is smooth and incredibly detailed. Their response is flat and there is plenty of bass… not overblown. These are exactly what I expected from a brand like Beyerdynamic. Absolutely satisfied. Build quality is very good and I imagine these will last me many years.

  15. Anonymous says:

     United Kingdom

    Generally positive about these, and they are loud but not always detail clear. Well made and very comfortable. Being open back you end up sharing your music with others. Try the Beyerdynamic closed back versions.

  16. MartaBroger says:

     United Kingdom

    Very nice, only problem is it tends to crackle every so ofte

  17. Noelia5128 says:

     United Kingdom

    Sound cancel is not great but sound quality is brillia

  18. Anonymous says:

     

    Like:
    general sound quality
    Comfortable
    Dislike:
    A little treble hash
    Sub bass isn’t great (open back)

  19. Anonymous says:

     United Kingdom

    So I’ve gone through 3 pairs of headphones in the last months purely because of comfort The Arctic’s SteelSeries Pros , Astro A50s and now the DT 990s and of all of them these are by far the best for comfort they sit on your head and feel like nothing is there, so light weight and soft it’s great compared to the other two these have it going for them and the product quality is far better especially for gaming.

  20. FYRWileyzreq says:

     United Kingdom

    Sound Quality: Excellent for price, great sound separation when provided with a correct EQ.
    Bass Ability: Dubstep Approved. (For headphones very good. Nothing beats a high powered active subwoofer though.)
    Comfortable to wear: Yes.
    Other comments: Make sure you have a suitable amp to drive these headphones as they are 250 impedance.

  21. DesmondQuarles says:

     United Kingdom

    Golden Review Award: 9 From Our UsersJust received these this afternoon. I already own Amirons, DT 880s and DT 770s and Grado SR80s. I’m not a fan of Sennheiser, so anyone who is familiar with both Beyerdynamic and Sennheiser headphones will appreciate that this is a subjective review by someone who likes Beyerdynamic’s house sound. This review is my assessment of them purely for home use.

    There are obviously loads of reviews of the 990s on the internet, and although very popular they obviously divide opinion. I shan’t make out that these are for everybody, but I’ll add my three pennies worth here which might cut through the superlative laden ayes and the damning nays and help some people to make up their minds on whether or not to buy a pair (I dithered for far too long).

    When I was in my early twenties I might have found the Beyerdynamic sound too bright and analytical, but back then I could hear frequencies up to 20khz; not so now, at 63 my hearing tops out just under 14khz, so maybe this accounts for my later-in-life infatuation with the Beyerdynamic sound. Though I like most forms of music, the bulk of my collection veers towards acoustic music – classical, jazz etc – there’s also a fair bit of dub reggae, rock, EDM and so on (so, it’s basically Prince Far-I to Schubert, Aphex Twin to CSNY, Thelonious Monk to Joni Mitchell, Public Enermy to Spirit, Poppy Ackroyd to Bob Dylan – catholic, essentially).

    I’ve only had a few hours to make comparisons (Bill Withers, Thelonious Monk, Radio 3, Bill Charlap, Heart of the Congos, Lana Del Rey), but I think this has given me adequate opportunity to make a pretty accurate judgement of the characteristics and comparative merits of the 990s. I’ve been listening to them mainly through a Little Dot Mk 2 with a combination of Novosibirsk and Mullard 8100 valves (sourcing from a Cyrus Cd and Cyrus 8 DAC amplifier).

    I’m delighted with the 990s. They are neither shriekingly sibilant nor either lacking or over-endowed with bass. Compared to the other headphones that I own I would say that the 990s are nearest in sound to the 880s. Indeed, I think that they are very near sound-wise. The 880s are marginally more polished, but the difference (to my ears at least) is subtle rather than dramatic. I would suggest that the 990s are very good, cheaper alternatives to the 880s. The 880s clamp the head noticeably more lightly than the 990s, but the 990s are more secure on the head. Sound leakage is similar in both, so neither are good for listening to next to your sleeping partner (who hates going off to music and especially hates jazz) in bed unless you want a poke in the ribs. For this I have the 770s, which have a somewhat “fuller” or “fatter” sound than the other two. Leakage on the 770s is minimal at low to modest volumes.

    The Amirons (Homes) are, to my mind, decidedly more “musical” or “liquid” sounding headphones, very enjoyable for extended listening and very revealing, in comparison with those I would describe the 990s and 880s as rather “analytical” sounding and the 770s are somewhat “dryer” (I hope describing their sound as both “dryer” and “fatter” doesn’t sound like a contradiction in terms but I can’t immediately think of a better words to describe the sound). However, they’re all good and all have what you might call a “house sound” (i.e. a Beyerdynamic sound), although the Amirons depart furthest from this sound (which isn’t really very far at all) while the others might all be considered even more typical. The Amirons have a fuller, certainly pleasant and, I would say, slightly coloured bass by comparison, the bass on the 880s and 990s is leaner and, as far as I am qualified to judge, seemingly more accurate. Some people say that they both lack bass, but I don’t think this it true, it is most certainly there when it’s there! It may be that those who think they lack bass are listening to these headphones without suitable amplification. As goes the 770s, I’d say that their bass – in terms of weight – lies in the middle here, it is perfectly good but it is neither as accurate as on the 880s and 990s nor as pleasurable as on the Amirons.

    Sound stage is best, and very similar, on the 990s, 880s and Amirons. I wouldn’t say that there is any vastly significant difference here between these three headphones. The 770s, being closed-back, are noticeably more “closed-in” in terms of soundstage but, in terms of closed-back headphones per se they’re actually really rather good in this area; I’ve certainly not encountered a closed-back pair that are better (or indeed any other closed-back pair that I can actually bear – I personally much prefer open-back designs, for me the 770s are exceptions in this department). The 1770s may well be better, but I’m not about to fork out several hundred pounds more for those when I use closed-back headphones mostly for listening in bed via the headphone output of a Roberts radio.

    As regards comparison with the Grado SR 80s, the 990s and 880s are decidedly superior sounding, with the Grados sounding rather rough and uncouth by comparison (though this isn’t helped by the Grados comfort levels which are simply not in the same league – half an hour with Grado SR80 ear pads is sheer torture; consequently I’ve replaced them with Sennheiser HD414 ear pads which improbably (as, apart from being yellow, they don’t seem materially that different from the Grado pads) improve matters a fair bit and don’t noticeably change the SR80s sound). The Grados do sound more bassy, but this is definitely a matter of quantity rather than quality. Build quality on the Grado SR80s is also markedly inferior to that of the Beyerdynamics. I would retire the Grados at this point, but their 32 Ohm impedance makes them useful. They’re good fun, but they’re not good for extended listening sessions.

    The 990s and 880s with their 250 Ohm impedance definitely need amplification. I use a couple of Little Dot Mk 2s. The Amirons have the same impedance but are significantly more sensitive. For unamplified use I find the 770s a better match with their 80 Ohm impedance (they certainly work well with most Roberts radios of recent years, Roberts seem to have pretty good headphone circuits on their radios).

    Summing up, I think that the 990s are fantastic value for money (the Amiron Homes, which I love, are perhaps a clear case of diminishing returns by comparison). If you’re thinking of buying a pair of Beyerdynamics, want open-backed headphones, fancy the 880s from all you’ve read, but feel that the 880s are a stretch for you financially, then I think you’d be missing very little with the 990s in terms of sound).

    Originally, I had thought of purchasing Beyerdynamic’s new DT900 X headphones, but – reading the reviews, and knowing how much I already liked the sound of the 880s and 770s – I thought I’d save myself some money and get something that might not sound so hugely different for half the price and, beyond that, I actually prefer the look of the 990s. I don’t rule out considering the new series in future, but for now I don’t feel I’m missing out on anything that would be game-changing, although I admit I’m curious. As I have found repeatedly, however wild the superlatives I encounter in the reviews the actual differences between the last and the latest model of a particular piece of hifi is more often than not a matter of nuance.

    Whatever way you cut it, comparing the 990s with the highly regarded and (to me) very similar sounding 880s and the more refined, more relaxed, but four or five times more expensive Amiron Homes, they are still very good sounding headphones and first class value for money – assuming, like me, you like the Beyerdynamic sound. If you’re a Sennheiser fan you’d probably be barking up the wrong tree (but you know that already) and, if you’re a Beats fan, then presumably you’re already stone deaf. And then again, as goes highly regarded budget headphones, I reckon they knock the Grado SR80s into a cocked hat. But not everyone would agree with me.

    Anyway, I hope all that helps.

    Update, 28/1/22. I’ve now spent some more time listening to the 990s on a Little Dot Mk 2 with a combination of Novosibirsk and Radio Technique valves (sourcing from a Naim CD5 via a Rega Elex R). The Radio Technique valves are very similar to the Mullard 8100s I used at the top of this piece. Continued close listening has only confirmed my sense of how good these headphones are. On further consideration, with this set up, I’d say their sound signature lies between that of the 880s and the Amirons. I’d say they sound slightly “weightier” than the 880s and that the Amirons are a bit more so, but the differences here are more subtle than seismic. On careful comparison, after a few hours of listening, my overwhelming sense at this point is that, if you like open-backed headphones, like the Beyerdynamic sound and have a hankering for a pair of Amirons but either can’t afford them or can’t justify the expense, then you really wouldn’t be missing very much at all by just settling for a pair of 990s. By comparison they are a real bargain and, I think, in absolute terms they are quite simply one of the best bargains there is on the headphone market.

    One further point, on comfort, although the 990s have more clamping force on the head, I actually find them more comfortable than the Amirons as they fit my head better.

    Finally, as anyone who has read this far has already probably figured out, it has cost me quite a lot to reach my conclusions here. I think I have a reasonable sense of humour, but if you’re an audiophile sceptic then I guess I can understand why you may feel you’re getting the last laugh! I’m glad I own the Amirons, they are very nice headphones, but if I could only have one pair I must admit that I’d very happily settle for the 990s.

    Postscript, 31/1/22. On further reflection, it’s very good having several headphones all sharing a general character that I like, but each a little different from the others. Different music works best on certain headphones (for instance, listening to Beatrice Rana’s performance of the Goldberg Variations this morning I much prefer the rendition of her piano’s sound through the Amirons to that of the 770s (the piano sounding decidedly more lifelike through the Amirons), whereas with Thelonious Monk’s It’s Monk’s Time the difference is less obvious and, if anything, I’d say I actually prefer the 770s with their greater attack. But, different music is not all: different recordings, different source equipment, different mood of the listener … however, it’s very quick and easy to change between modestly priced headphones during a listening session in order to optimise your listening experience (something you can’t readily do with expensive speakers, amplifiers, cartridges and so on).

  22. CNET.com Staff says:

     United Kingdom

    Just received these this afternoon. I already own Amirons, DT 880s and DT 770s and Grado SR80s. I’m not a fan of Sennheiser, so anyone who is familiar with both Beyerdynamic and Sennheiser headphones will appreciate that this is a subjective review by someone who likes Beyerdynamic’s house sound. This review is my assessment of them purely for home use.

    There are obviously loads of reviews of the 990s on the internet, and although very popular they obviously divide opinion. I shan’t make out that these are for everybody, but I’ll add my three pennies worth here which might cut through the superlative laden ayes and the damning nays and help some people to make up their minds on whether or not to buy a pair (I dithered for far too long).

    When I was in my early twenties I might have found the Beyerdynamic sound too bright and analytical, but back then I could hear frequencies up to 20khz; not so now, at 63 my hearing tops out just under 14khz, so maybe this accounts for my later-in-life infatuation with the Beyerdynamic sound. Though I like most forms of music, the bulk of my collection veers towards acoustic music – classical, jazz etc – there’s also a fair bit of dub reggae, rock, EDM and so on (so, it’s basically Prince Far-I to Schubert, Aphex Twin to CSNY, Thelonious Monk to Joni Mitchell, Public Enermy to Spirit, Poppy Ackroyd to Bob Dylan – catholic, essentially).

    I’ve only had a few hours to make comparisons (Bill Withers, Thelonious Monk, Radio 3, Bill Charlap, Heart of the Congos, Lana Del Rey), but I think this has given me adequate opportunity to make a pretty accurate judgement of the characteristics and comparative merits of the 990s. I’ve been listening to them mainly through a Little Dot Mk 2 with a combination of Novosibirsk and Mullard 8100 valves (sourcing from a Cyrus Cd and Cyrus 8 DAC amplifier).

    I’m delighted with the 990s. They are neither shriekingly sibilant nor either lacking or over-endowed with bass. Compared to the other headphones that I own I would say that the 990s are nearest in sound to the 880s. Indeed, I think that they are very near sound-wise. The 880s are marginally more polished, but the difference (to my ears at least) is subtle rather than dramatic. I would suggest that the 990s are very good, cheaper alternatives to the 880s. The 880s clamp the head noticeably more lightly than the 990s, but the 990s are more secure on the head. Sound leakage is similar in both, so neither are good for listening to next to your sleeping partner (who hates going off to music and especially hates jazz) in bed unless you want a poke in the ribs. For this I have the 770s, which have a somewhat “fuller” or “fatter” sound than the other two. Leakage on the 770s is minimal at low to modest volumes.

    The Amirons (Homes) are, to my mind, decidedly more “musical” or “liquid” sounding headphones, very enjoyable for extended listening and very revealing, in comparison with those I would describe the 990s and 880s as rather “analytical” sounding and the 770s are somewhat “dryer” (I hope describing their sound as both “dryer” and “fatter” doesn’t sound like a contradiction in terms but I can’t immediately think of a better words to describe the sound). However, they’re all good and all have what you might call a “house sound” (i.e. a Beyerdynamic sound), although the Amirons depart furthest from this sound (which isn’t really very far at all) while the others might all be considered even more typical. The Amirons have a fuller, certainly pleasant and, I would say, slightly coloured bass by comparison, the bass on the 880s and 990s is leaner and, as far as I am qualified to judge, seemingly more accurate. Some people say that they both lack bass, but I don’t think this it true, it is most certainly there when it’s there! It may be that those who think they lack bass are listening to these headphones without suitable amplification. As goes the 770s, I’d say that their bass – in terms of weight – lies in the middle here, it is perfectly good but it is neither as accurate as on the 880s and 990s nor as pleasurable as on the Amirons.

    Sound stage is best, and very similar, on the 990s, 880s and Amirons. I wouldn’t say that there is any vastly significant difference here between these three headphones. The 770s, being closed-back, are noticeably more “closed-in” in terms of soundstage but, in terms of closed-back headphones per se they’re actually really rather good in this area; I’ve certainly not encountered a closed-back pair that are better (or indeed any other closed-back pair that I can actually bear – I personally much prefer open-back designs, for me the 770s are exceptions in this department). The 1770s may well be better, but I’m not about to fork out several hundred pounds more for those when I use closed-back headphones mostly for listening in bed via the headphone output of a Roberts radio.

    As regards comparison with the Grado SR 80s, the 990s and 880s are decidedly superior sounding, with the Grados sounding rather rough and uncouth by comparison (though this isn’t helped by the Grados comfort levels which are simply not in the same league – half an hour with Grado SR80 ear pads is sheer torture; consequently I’ve replaced them with Sennheiser HD414 ear pads which improbably (as, apart from being yellow, they don’t seem materially that different from the Grado pads) improve matters a fair bit and don’t noticeably change the SR80s sound). The Grados do sound more bassy, but this is definitely a matter of quantity rather than quality. Build quality on the Grado SR80s is also markedly inferior to that of the Beyerdynamics. I would retire the Grados at this point, but their 32 Ohm impedance makes them useful. They’re good fun, but they’re not good for extended listening sessions.

    The 990s and 880s with their 250 Ohm impedance definitely need amplification. I use a couple of Little Dot Mk 2s. The Amirons have the same impedance but are significantly more sensitive. For unamplified use I find the 770s a better match with their 80 Ohm impedance (they certainly work well with most Roberts radios of recent years, Roberts seem to have pretty good headphone circuits on their radios).

    Summing up, I think that the 990s are fantastic value for money (the Amiron Homes, which I love, are perhaps a clear case of diminishing returns by comparison). If you’re thinking of buying a pair of Beyerdynamics, want open-backed headphones, fancy the 880s from all you’ve read, but feel that the 880s are a stretch for you financially, then I think you’d be missing very little with the 990s in terms of sound).

    Originally, I had thought of purchasing Beyerdynamic’s new DT900 X headphones, but – reading the reviews, and knowing how much I already liked the sound of the 880s and 770s – I thought I’d save myself some money and get something that might not sound so hugely different for half the price and, beyond that, I actually prefer the look of the 990s. I don’t rule out considering the new series in future, but for now I don’t feel I’m missing out on anything that would be game-changing, although I admit I’m curious. As I have found repeatedly, however wild the superlatives I encounter in the reviews the actual differences between the last and the latest model of a particular piece of hifi is more often than not a matter of nuance.

    Whatever way you cut it, comparing the 990s with the highly regarded and (to me) very similar sounding 880s and the more refined, more relaxed, but four or five times more expensive Amiron Homes, they are still very good sounding headphones and first class value for money – assuming, like me, you like the Beyerdynamic sound. If you’re a Sennheiser fan you’d probably be barking up the wrong tree (but you know that already) and, if you’re a Beats fan, then presumably you’re already stone deaf. And then again, as goes highly regarded budget headphones, I reckon they knock the Grado SR80s into a cocked hat. But not everyone would agree with me.

    Anyway, I hope all that helps.

    Update, 28/1/22. I’ve now spent some more time listening to the 990s on a Little Dot Mk 2 with a combination of Novosibirsk and Radio Technique valves (sourcing from a Naim CD5 via a Rega Elex R). The Radio Technique valves are very similar to the Mullard 8100s I used at the top of this piece. Continued close listening has only confirmed my sense of how good these headphones are. On further consideration, with this set up, I’d say their sound signature lies between that of the 880s and the Amirons. I’d say they sound slightly “weightier” than the 880s and that the Amirons are a bit more so, but the differences here are more subtle than seismic. On careful comparison, after a few hours of listening, my overwhelming sense at this point is that, if you like open-backed headphones, like the Beyerdynamic sound and have a hankering for a pair of Amirons but either can’t afford them or can’t justify the expense, then you really wouldn’t be missing very much at all by just settling for a pair of 990s. By comparison they are a real bargain and, I think, in absolute terms they are quite simply one of the best bargains there is on the headphone market.

    One further point, on comfort, although the 990s have more clamping force on the head, I actually find them more comfortable than the Amirons as they fit my head better.

    Finally, as anyone who has read this far has already probably figured out, it has cost me quite a lot to reach my conclusions here. I think I have a reasonable sense of humour, but if you’re an audiophile sceptic then I guess I can understand why you may feel you’re getting the last laugh! I’m glad I own the Amirons, they are very nice headphones, but if I could only have one pair I must admit that I’d very happily settle for the 990s.

    Postscript, 31/1/22. On further reflection, it’s very good having several headphones all sharing a general character that I like, but each a little different from the others. Different music works best on certain headphones (for instance, listening to Beatrice Rana’s performance of the Goldberg Variations this morning I much prefer the rendition of her piano’s sound through the Amirons to that of the 770s (the piano sounding decidedly more lifelike through the Amirons), whereas with Thelonious Monk’s It’s Monk’s Time the difference is less obvious and, if anything, I’d say I actually prefer the 770s with their greater attack. But, different music is not all: different recordings, different source equipment, different mood of the listener … however, it’s very quick and easy to change between modestly priced headphones during a listening session in order to optimise your listening experience (something you can’t readily do with expensive speakers, amplifiers, cartridges and so on).

  23. Anonymous says:

     United Kingdom

    The Beyerdynamic DT 990 Pro is a pair of studio-quality open-back headphones designed and manufactured specifically for music producers.

    I’ve been producing my own electronic music since late August 2020 and I felt like I needed a top-notch pair of headphones to make up for a lack of studio monitor speakers. And I’m very pleased with the DT 990 Pro!

    Not only are these pair of headphones comfortable to wear and easy to adjust, but they also provide a vast frequency response from bass to treble, thus delivering top-notch quality sound to your ears. This allows you to hear all the little details in music and sound which is necessary for efficient music producing.

    The main drawbacks to these headphones are that, beside they’re open-back, they’re not good for noise cancellation or vocal recording. If you wear these headphones while recording your own vocals, there’s a good chance that your microphone will pick up the sound coming out of these headphones through their open backs. Therefore, when you want to record your own vocals, you’re better off using either closed-back headphones or noise cancellation earphones.

    All in all, the Beyerdynamic DT 990 are a pair of comfortable, studio-quality headphones that are ideal for music producing but not for vocal recording.

  24. Jeff the ALDI Shopper says:

     United Kingdom

    The Beyerdynamic DT 990 Pro is a pair of studio-quality open-back headphones designed and manufactured specifically for music producers.

    I’ve been producing my own electronic music since late August 2020 and I felt like I needed a top-notch pair of headphones to make up for a lack of studio monitor speakers. And I’m very pleased with the DT 990 Pro!

    Not only are these pair of headphones comfortable to wear and easy to adjust, but they also provide a vast frequency response from bass to treble, thus delivering top-notch quality sound to your ears. This allows you to hear all the little details in music and sound which is necessary for efficient music producing.

    The main drawbacks to these headphones are that, beside they’re open-back, they’re not good for noise cancellation or vocal recording. If you wear these headphones while recording your own vocals, there’s a good chance that your microphone will pick up the sound coming out of these headphones through their open backs. Therefore, when you want to record your own vocals, you’re better off using either closed-back headphones or noise cancellation earphones.

    All in all, the Beyerdynamic DT 990 are a pair of comfortable, studio-quality headphones that are ideal for music producing but not for vocal recording.

  25. Anonymous says:

     United Kingdom

    Using it for a year – love it.
    My version is 250 Ohm and it really makes the difference.
    Sound is clear and high impedance adds a lot of details into sound.
    Open construction make it easy to wear for long hours.
    However it will be noisy for people around. So it for more like ambient listenning by the evening.
    Coiled cord very convinient for use with laptop or player.
    Manufactured by “the germans”.. meaning it has quality build and does not dissolve anywhere soon after purchase.
    Just great headphones wich will not force you to sell an arm and leg to have it.
    If you towards audiophile type of listener, you just have to have it.

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